Life without Fast Fashion

The exhibition “Fast Fashion” at the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg

Recently, I published an article about my breakup with Gap, my favorite clothing brand. During my first two months post Gap and fast fashion in general, I’ve learned a few things.

  1. It is much easier to simply care about myself first. What I like, what I want, and when I want it. How I want to look, what I want to wear, and how much I want to pay.
  2. My desire for more and new is overwhelming. I look into my closet and see nothing that I feel like wearing. Everything is outdated I think to myself. But is it really? And who says?
  3. I can make do with less. It’s been so good to stop and think before I buy. Fair trade clothing is most easily accessible to me online, so I really have to like something to order it. And the truth is, fair trade clothes cost more than buying something at Gap Outlet or Forever 21. Therefore, I have to buy less – but that’s actually helpful because it’s really made me examine my motives for spending. (Sites that I’ve purchased from include PACT, Fair Indigo, and Monkee Genes – still waiting to receive my jeans from Monkee, but everything else from the first two have been great.)

I can’t stop thinking about the Pumpkin Spice Latte revolution. Customers desired to know what was in their Starbucks’ Pumpkin Spice Latte… and then when they found out, they wanted it changed. Therefore, Starbucks took out the artificial coloring and added real pumpkin. People were incredibly passionate about pumpkin spice lattes… and demanded a beverage be changed… and it changed. What if we were incredibly passionate about other people and demanded that they were treated like we would want to be?

Documentary: The True Cost

This is a story about clothing. It’s about the clothes we wear, the people who make them and the impact it’s having on our world. The price of clothing has been decreasing for decades, while the human and environmental costs have grown dramatically.

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